Canadian Hunter Made A House Of Dead Wolves

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Every time when we think humanity can not sink any lower, we stumble upon more extreme evidence of wildlife crimes. In Alberta, Canada it is still legal to kill critically endangered wolves.

A house decorated with dead wolves

Its utterly sad and there are no words to describe this despicable mans callousness and lack of respect for nature. With no limit on killing wolves in Alberta, there will soon be no more wolves in Alberta, Canada, because of a**holes like the guy in the video below:

We’d also have to say Will Huppertz of Alberta is an expert in the art of harvesting coyotes and wolves. This is the result of his 2012 season. 352 Coyotes and 31 Wolves.

Because of the large populations of predators, Alberta’s game laws set no limit on either wolves or coyotes.

It seems like fiberglass might be a better way to insulate a barn though.

Romeo, a black-colored gray wolf lived at Mendenhall Glacier, near Juneau, Alaksa for about six years. Famously, Romeo had befriended visitors and dogs alike until he was killed by a poacher in 2009.

Support Wilmer Valderrama’s Fight to Keep Gray Wolves on The Endangered Species List

Gray wolves once roamed freely throughout North America, but by the early 20th century they had all but disappeared in the lower 48 states largely due to government-sponsored extermination programs, trophy hunters, trappers, and bounty systems. Since receiving federal protection under the Endangered Species Act in 1974, gray wolves have slowly started to regain their footing, expanding their population in the Great Lakes region and returning to the Northern Rocky Mountains and West Coast states through natural migration from Canada and reintroduction into Yellowstone.

Wolves still have a long way to go on the road to recovery. That’s why I was heartbroken when the Humane Society of the United States reached out to let me know about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (FWS) recently proposed rule to strip gray wolves of their federal ESA protections across the lower 48 states, putting them at risk once again. The same baseless and politically motivated fears and myths that led to the near-extinction of wolves in the lower 48 states by the early 20th century are still prevailing rather than the sound science that must guide these types of decisions. Organizations like the Humane Society of the United States are working to fight this disastrous rule, but they need your help. We can’t let history repeat itself.

The best available science shows that wolves still need their federal ESA protections. Over the past decade, we’ve seen the horrors that await wolves who lose their federal protections. State agencies are quick to bend to the whims of trophy hunters, trappers, and the agribusiness lobby and establish trophy hunting and trapping seasons. The methods used to kill wolves—including snares, steel-jawed leg-hold traps, baiting, and chasing them down with packs of hounds—are barbaric. Pups are frequently killed, and Idaho even lets trophy hunters kill mothers with dependent pups at their den sites. In most of Wyoming, there are no limits to the number of wolves that can be killed, and it is perfectly legal to kill a wolf by running them over with a snowmobile or other vehicle.

The trophy hunting and trapping of wolves doesn’t only kill the individuals in the crosshairs. Killing adult wolves can leave pups and young wolves to die from starvation, predation, and exposure. As highly intelligent, social, and family-oriented animals, killing individual wolves can disrupt a wolf pack’s social structure and cause the pack to fall apart.

Most Americans, including most of the people in states where wolves live, value wolves and want them protected. In the Great Lakes region, where wolves briefly lost their federal ESA protections between December 2011 and December 2014 (resulting in nearly 1,500 wolves being killed in just three seasons), residents have overwhelmingly rejected the trophy hunting and trapping of this iconic species. Their quiet strength, profound spirit, and elusive nature draw millions of wildlife-watching tourists to Yellowstone National Park and other areas each year, benefiting local economies and small businesses. According to FWS, in 2016, wildlife watchers outspent hunters by nearly 3 to 1. But the trophy hunting and trapping of wolves could bring those benefits to an end. Studies show that trophy hunting of wolves in areas next to protected areas (like Yellowstone) significantly reduces wolf sightings within those protected areas.

Taking wolves off the endangered species list is premature and will jeopardize their tenuous recovery. We can’t silently stand by and allow 40 years of enabling wolves to slowly begin making their way back from the brink of extinction to be thrown away just so that those few who want to kill wolves can have their way. Not only does the best available science demonstrate the need for continued protection under the ESA, but our collective values and conscience demand it. Please join me and my friends at the Humane Society of the United States in speaking up and submitting a polite comment telling the FWS that you want to keep wolves federally protected under the ESA. Just go to humanesociety.org/protectwolves to submit your comment today.

Source:

greenworldwarriors, one green planet, Cecil the Lion (Non-profit foundation)

26 COMMENTS

  1. The kind of person who even thinks up doing something like this (let alone actually DO it) has to be mentally sick beyond all belief.

  2. A disgusting maggot like all pathetic hunters making up for their lack of manhood by killing defenseless animals an utter waste of oxygen

  3. Who is this asshole? Anyway of finding out? Please God I’m hoping & praying that there aren’t anymore of these horrible people in Alberta😡😭😱

  4. Those are coyotes.
    Three possible explanations:
    (1) They are vermin to rural landowners with livestock. Livestock which provide an income for many rural landowners.
    (2) Depending on where it was, there could have been a bounty paid by the County.
    (3) He could have had a trapline and makes an income by selling the pelts.
    I live in rural Alberta and get tired of well intentioned, but grossly misinformed, urban dwellers telling us how we should live.
    I will concede the picture is a bit much.

    • None of those reason would be valid to hang dead pelts up to make a house. And don’t be so quick to judge urban dwellers, just because we choose not to hunt for food doesn’t make us misinformed. It’s ignorant hunters like this guy, who make ALL OF YOU LOOK BAD in a world where we don’t NEED to hunt but CHOOSE to hunt. You should be just as outraged as the rest of us at this tool for making all hunters look like ass—–.

  5. I hope some people…the worst of the worst.. catches aids / HIV and cancer and everything else and suffers a long slow death.

  6. The amount of misinformation in the article is pathetic. Quit pushing false information down people’s throats just because it suits your interests. First of all, those are coyotes, not wolves. Secondly, neither wolves, or coyotes are endangered in Canada. If they were endangered, we wouldn’t be allowed to hunt them. It’s called scientifically based predator management that biologists decide on, not emotionally driven. Predator overpopulation hurts farming other wildlife species that some people live on in rural areas, unlike people who live in cities where you can just go pick up a steak at the grocery store. You should be embarrassed for writing this article.

  7. One. Wolves are not critically endangered here in Alberta.
    Two. Those are not wolves but coyotes that have an open season on them as they are not endangered and are over populated here.
    If you are to publish such an inflammatory story at least have the courtesy to get your facts straight.
    Which you have not.

  8. Some of these comments show how little people know about predator control. Each wolf kills at least 15 elk or moose a year. When you have a pack of 10, they decimate the wildlife in the area. Coyotes have been harvested by people for income. In many places in Canada, this is just about all they have for an income source. Neither coyotes or wolves are anywhere near endangered and are in fact expanding their ranges on all continents. You catch them and dispatch them. Nothing cruel about it unless of course you don’t eat meat. You don’t put the cow back in the pasture after you take the hamburger. For you trolls that have a problem with it. Have a problem. We harvest (kill) coyotes and wolves for the benefit of other wildlife and for economic reasons. End of story.

  9. Disgusting disrespect for invaluable natural predators whose pack members are down 2 wolves! These so-called “men” come off as sickeningly sweet and appreciative of the beauty in their evil decision to cause their death. It’s a monstrous and twisted outlook on life, IMO.

  10. “Because of the large populations of predators, Alberta’s game laws set no limit on either wolves or coyotes.” — that line in your post really jumped out at me. I’m not sure the “large population” is necessarily the reason, since they freely admit that they don’t make any efforts to track wolf population numbers in Alberta. No one knows if the population is large or small in any given year, but wolves are still legal to hunt “indefinitely” during the winter months as a sport animal. Hunting wolves there is really just an artifact of centuries old laws, and a complete lack of any effort to change things.

    https://albertawilderness.ca/issues/wildlife/wolves/

  11. tried contacting the arsehole will huppertz on ihuntalberta.com but this site doesnt exist anymore for some reason so left him a comment on its page murdering piece of shit!!!!

  12. TOO ME IT DISPLAYS A DISRESPECT FOR SOME OF NORTH AMERICAS MOST EFFICIENT PREDATORS BOTH WOLVES AND COYOTES SHOWN HERE, AND 2ND ONLY TO MAN ON THE FOOD CHAIN. NAKED ON NAKED THIS PERSON WOULD NOT STAND A CHANCE AGAINST ANY THEM. THEY KEEP THE OTHER HERDS HEALTHY AND FIT. AS FAR AS PROTECTING DOMESTIC HERDS ONE DONKEY CAN AND WILL PROTECT THEM AGAINST ENTIRE PACKS, AND CAN NOT ONLY KICK THEM TO DEATH BUT BITE THEM AS WELL. REMEMBER ONLY 6% OF CANADA IS ACTUALLY OCCUPIED. WHICH LEAVES A WHOLE LOT OF ROOM FOR BEARS AND WOLVES AND MANY OTHER OF GODS CREATURES. IF YOUR IN THEIR TERRITORY YOU SHOULD TAKE PROPER PRECAUTIONS TO PROTECT WHAT YOU VALUE THAT IS POTENTIAL FOOD. NO BOUNTY SHOULD BE ESTABLISHED WITH OUT A PROPER EVALUATION , AND RISK WEIGHTED AGAINST LOSS. JUST SHOW SOME RESPECT FOR NATURE.

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